aspiringdoctors

thenotquitedoctor:

Dr. Kevin Ahern (premed advisor at Oregon State) has a series of videos on YouTube that are absolutely excellent for banishing pre-interview jitters. He has some wonderful advice about how to prepare for an interview, how to dress, body language, how to handle tough questions, etc.—you name the scenario and he has covered it. 

I watched his videos before my interviews and felt much more confident. I would say his videos are the next best thing to a personal coach (seriously who can afford that?) and mock interviews. It’s a 2-3 hour time investment, but I was glad I watched them. Hope they might be helpful for those of you who are still anxiously awaiting interviews or who are preparing to apply next cycle. 

Here’s part 2 of the video as well!

laboratoryequipment
laboratoryequipment:

Are Failing Bees Foreshadowing Human Health?It’s become something of a rite of spring. Every March, newspaper stories sprout about local beekeepers opening their hives to find an ongoing environmental mystery. Instead of hungry bees ready for the first flights of spring, honeycombs that should be empty after a long winter are full, and instead the hives are empty. For some reason, during winter’s coldest months, these bees chose to leave the hive to perish outside.A professor of environmental exposure biology believes that the potential human health implications of colony collapse disorder extend beyond the drop in pollination— though that is worrisome enough— to the impact on humans of long exposure to low-level poisons like neonicotinoid pesticides, which have been suspected in the bee disorder.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/are-failing-bees-foreshadowing-human-health

laboratoryequipment:

Are Failing Bees Foreshadowing Human Health?

It’s become something of a rite of spring. Every March, newspaper stories sprout about local beekeepers opening their hives to find an ongoing environmental mystery. Instead of hungry bees ready for the first flights of spring, honeycombs that should be empty after a long winter are full, and instead the hives are empty. For some reason, during winter’s coldest months, these bees chose to leave the hive to perish outside.

A professor of environmental exposure biology believes that the potential human health implications of colony collapse disorder extend beyond the drop in pollination— though that is worrisome enough— to the impact on humans of long exposure to low-level poisons like neonicotinoid pesticides, which have been suspected in the bee disorder.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/are-failing-bees-foreshadowing-human-health

trustmeima-biologist

archiemcphee:

All babies are small compared to their parents, but there is something particularly awesome about the size difference between this proud mama Galápagos Tortoise and her tiny new hatchlings, who emerged from their shells back in January 2014 at Australia’s Taronga Western Plains Zoo. This zoo became the first in Australia to successfully breed Galápagos Tortoises when RJ, the slightly larger baby you see standing between the wee hatchlings and parent, hatched three years ago.

One of the longest-living vertebrates, Galápagos Tortoises can live for over 100 years in the wild and reach weights of around 880 pounds (400 kg) and lenghths of up to 5 feet (1.5 m). They are found only on the Galápagos archipelago, west of continental Ecuador.

Head over to ZooBorns for additional photos and to learn more about Galápagos Tortoises.

the-science-of-time

txchnologist:

image

by Txchnologist staff

Bioengineers have cobbled together DNA fragments from several organisms to build remote-controlled protein motors that change course and speed on command.

By customizing these proteins, which normally ferry molecules around inside cells,…